Content Marketing Best Practices [+ Planning Tips for Video]

Content Marketing Best Practices [+ Planning Tips for Video]

We know that content marketing, by design, is a technique of marketing built on the creation and distribution of relevant content to attract our desired audience – to influence customer action.

Switching gears a bit, if I ask you to think of the top industry with the heaviest hand of influence, reaching the broadest audience, what would you say?

Perhaps what comes to mind is the entertainment industry, bolstered by visual genius juggernauts of Hollywood.

When I posed the question, if you didn’t think of the entertainment industry, maybe your mind went to the news & information industry.

If neither the entertainment nor news & information industries were top of mind for you, I am curious to know what industry came to mind.

The next question I pose is this: what are some commonalities between the entertainment and news & information industries?

purplegator wally

They’re storytelling Outlets.

They both have a high level of influence and some level of control over messaging.

They both use video as the richest means of communication.

Video allows for an experience of showing, not telling. Furthermore, it encourages showing, not selling. No matter what you’re selling, product or service, video needs to be in your content marketing. It will massively enhance the results of your marketing efforts.

Case Study: How Video Ads Perform Versus Display & Search

While I know what we’re talking about is content marketing, I want to share some data from some ad campaigns Purplegator has run.

The video ad below ran for two weeks. As this table illustrates, the video ad garnered 313, 200 impressions. It had a view rate of 49.95% (sometimes known as interaction rate) and an average cost per view (CPV) of $0.02.

content marketing storytelling through video ad

To further drive this point, allow me to use this data to draw some comparisons.

Below is a table with data from three types of campaigns: display, search, and video.

seachvideodisplayads

The display ad, which ran for two months, garnered 165,788 impressions and an interaction rate of 1.37%. It had an average cost of $0.30.

The search ad, which has been continually running since December of 2018, has garnered 19,769 impressions and an interaction rate of 2.54%.  Its average cost was $3.09.

With these numbers in mind, wouldn’t you agree that whether we’re talking about advertising and content marketing, video is a top performer?

Video in Content Marketing Versus Organic Social Media

To show some numbers in content marketing, let’s take a look at some data from a few posts Purplegator shared on Facebook.

As you can see, the video reached a higher number of people and also received more engagements. The image got ~11% of the number of people the video did and ~10% of engagements that the video did.

Start Doing Your Videos for Content Marketing | Helpful questions to help you plan

As far as best practices for content marketing through video, I like to ask myself the following questions:

  • Big picture first, what is the goal or marketing objective of this video?
    • Awareness?
    • Conversions?
    • Traffic?
  • With the goal in mind, who is my perfect viewer, or target audience?
    • Do I have a good handle on their buyer persona?
    • Do I understand where they are in their buyer journey?
  • What kind of video is this?
    • Interview
    • Review
    • Vlog
    • Tutorial
    • Case Study
    • Presentation
  • What’s the story? Does the story have all three parts of a well-developed story:
    • Beginning
    • Middle
    • End
  • Is there an opportunity to make this video a part of a series, or is it truly a standalone story?
  • On which platform(s) will I be sharing this video?
  • Do I have accompanying content planned or already composed for diversification and atomization purposes?

Reach for the Stars!

When thinking of answering these questions, I like to filter my thoughts and planning perspective through a Hollywood lens. I’m by no way saying that any video content I produce is Hollywood-worthy. I mean that if Hollywood exemplifies the highest standard of storytelling through video, then that’s the process I’m going to try to replicate. The level of quality I’m aiming for, proportionately, to what is realistically achievable within my industry.

Brands & Companies to Watch

If you’re curious to explore some examples of brands and industry giants that are leveraging video content exceptionally well, look at Lululemon, Red Bull, Lana Del Rey, Blendtec, and Chef Adam Kenworthy.


The inspiration for this post came from a prompt for an expert roundup called “9 Video Marketing Tips to Level Up Your Content Strategy,” compiled and written by Jordan Stella, SEO & Social Media Manager for UpCity.

Crisis Mitigated: Social Media Manager Rescues Your Brand Identity, Proves She’s Worth her Weight in Gold

Crisis Mitigated: Social Media Manager Rescues Your Brand Identity, Proves She’s Worth her Weight in Gold

Any good business leader knows the first step in a crisis management strategy is always anticipate. Sure, now that we are in the midst of a crisis like no one has ever seen before, it is not helpful to draw attention to a weakness (like, maybe you never created a plan to manage a crisis in the first place). So I won’t go over all of the steps to take in crisis management that occur in the pre-crisis timeframe.

Communication Is Key
Audience & Timing

If you don’t already know who your audience is, or maybe you haven’t thought about it concretely before, think about this first. Who are they, and what tone and information are essential to them? Once you know who your audience is, commit–to yourself and your customers- that you will touch base with them. Ideally, it will be publicly at least once a day during the crisis. It’s a good idea to reach out as needed when any breaking news that affects your business or audience occurs as well.

When you have laid these parameters out, then you need to have a plan each day for the things that are critical for you to express to your follower base. Even if you’re thinking, “What could I possibly have to say to my customers each day?” believe me, there’s no shortage of appropriate things for you to share with them.

What’s In It For Me?

It’s the responsible and thoughtful thing to stay present in the conversation during a crisis. Then, when business does go back to usual in the future, you will have remained top of mind to customers. Which is important during a time when you couldn’t necessarily be selling to them in the traditional sense. Need something to further drive this point? They’ll also likely view you as a company that cares. Your company is diligently serving their customers, no matter the conditions. Perhaps you could even convert casual customers to loyal customers. They could be customers for life based on your actions and communication in a crisis.

Channel Choice

If you now understand that being vocal during a crisis is required, let me offer some tips and strategies you can use starting as soon as today! Like I mentioned before, you should commit to touching base with your customers once a day. What channel works best? That all depends on who your customer is. Here is a handy table from the Pew Research Center that breaks down data of the use of different online platforms. Note, it is broken down by demographic groups.

 

Customer Example 1

For example, if your primary customer is a woman in her mid to late 20s, Facebook or YouTube would be worth your while. With your commitment to reaching out and touching base with your customers every day, maybe each day, you could record a short video (3 minutes or longer) to share with them any updated messaging that might affect them from your company. Fortunately, both Facebook and YouTube are channels where video is essential, so this example is slick!

Customer Example 2

Speaking of nurturing relationships, I want to take a moment to note that I understand this is an unprecedented time in history. I’m tired of saying that and I’m tired of reading it, hearing it, and so on. With that said, if you hear from me during this pandemic and it is anything business-related, I hope you know that I am not here to pitch you. My role as the Social Media Manager for Purplegator is to create excellent content. I am here to develop and engage in the right conversations. As the Social Media Manager for Purplegator, I’m promoting what’s unique and stellar about the company and all of our clients. I am not in sales. Never have been, and most likely never will be.

Should you want to check out Purplegator and tuck our info away for another day, that’s cool with me. If you need social media management (or any of our other digital services) and you would appreciate a more one on one conversation about it, connect with me, or message me. I will be happy to start any of those conversations!

Regardless of your business needs, I hope you got some nugget to save for later or maybe a reminder of something you already knew to be true. Please stay safe and sane.